Going Dutch

Dutch Door Home Bunch

{Chambers & Chambers Architects via Home Bunch}

I have always loved the charm of dutch doors. While they’re not terribly common in Houston, most likely due to our long summers and humid climate, they are much more prevalent in other parts of the country. In addition to adding charm and architectural interest to any space, they continue to serve the same purpose they did centuries ago– keeping animals and dirt outside and children inside while allowing daylight and fresh air to stream in. Thought to originally have been conceived in the Netherlands during the seventeenth century, they appear in a lot of Dutch paintings from that period and as such, half, double-hung, or stable doors, came to be known as Dutch doors. Eventually, they found their way into New England before the American Revolution and like all of the best design elements, have remained a timeless classic to this day. I’d love to include one in a client project or in a future house one day!

Dutch Door Inspired Room

{Sawyer Berson Architects}

Sarah Bartholomew residence, kitchen

{Sarah Bartholomew}

Dutch Door Utility Room

{Image via Pinterest }

Dutch Door Melanie Turner

{Melanie Turner}

Dutch Door Lucas Studo Luxe

{Lucas Studio as featured in Luxe}

Dutch Door Arch Digest

{Architectural Digest}

dutch door ike kligerman barkley

{Ike Kligerman Barkley}

Dutch Door Urban Electric

{via Urban Electric Co.}

chambers chambers millvalley_278_1

{Chambers & Chambers Architects}

Paloma Signature

8 thoughts on “Going Dutch

  1. Hands down a favorite post! Many think they can’t use these because of “bugs”. We solved this with a client by using a retractable screen. She can have fresh air and pups stay inside without tearing up the screen. Love all these examples!-Laurel Bledsoe

  2. We had a dutch door on our back door to the laundry room in the little house we rented when my husband was in college, it was so cute. We lived in Florida then and I agree with the previous commenter, too many bugs. I never see them anymore but they have so much charm it’s too bad. We lived in Colorado for 25 years, did not have AC and it would be great to have there. Such a wonderful, dry climate and not too many bugs.

  3. Spectacular post! These are common in older and rural homes in the Caribbean where I grew up.
    These doors were usually located off the kitchen leading to the backyard. Stoves had no hoods in those days, so the Dutch door served the practical purpose of venting the kitchen, and letting our neighbors know what we were cooking!

  4. Wonderful post! I grew up in the SF Bay Area and Napa Valley. A dutch door was considered essential by my parents. To this day I miss them. Living in New Orleans with its heat and humidity offers me zero opportunity to consider one. These beautiful photos bring back great memories and offer such a wonderful example of another way to connect the indoors with the outdoors. Thank you!

  5. I wish that I saw dutch doors more frequently, they really add a sense of charm and uniqueness to a space. I adore how they can be modified to any home decor style; the indigo blue door airs on the side of modern, while the white ones with glass windows are more french country.

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